Fighting Over Tax Revenue in Europe

There’s been a burst of news recently about how multinational companies (“MNCs”) use corporate structures (and of course the transfer pricing that goes with it) to reduce their tax bills. Starbucks, Apple, and most recently Amazon have all been getting lots of unwelcome press about their European tax planning strategies.

This is nothing new, of course. But there does seem to be a slightly different flavor to the criticism this time around. In the current round of attention it seems that national tax administrations are coming under as much scrutiny as the companies involved, with certain countries being accused of essentially colluding with MNCs to facilitate their tax minimization. Last week we learned that the EU has commenced an anti-competition investigation against Luxembourg related to the tax treatment that the country applies to MNCs.  And this week it was announced that Ireland will, under pressure, revise its tax regulations to eliminate one type of corporate structure that MNCs can use to reduce their tax liabilities.  The Economist reports:

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BONO may front one of the world’s most popular rock bands, but the U2 singer did not earn many new fans when he recently defended Ireland’s controversial tax policies, which are widely seen as helping multinationals to avoid paying their fair share. Even Ireland’s government seems to be having doubts. On October 14th it announced plans to close the country’s biggest loophole, the “Double Irish”.

The Double Irish allows companies to shift their profits from high-tax countries to havens… Users can thereby cut their effective tax rate—perfectly legally—far below Ireland’s already low 12.5% rate, in some cases down to less than 2%…

From January all new companies domiciled in Ireland will also have to be tax-residents there, making the Double Irish impossible. Ireland is acting under pressure from America, the European Commission and the OECD, which are working on multilateral reform of international tax rules to curb avoidance.

On one level focusing attention on the countries involved, rather than MNCs, makes perfect sense.  After all, MNCs are simply doing the best that they can for their owners, given each country’s tax rules as they are written. (The degree of involvement that MNCs have in the writing of those tax rules is an interesting but separate question that we’ll have to leave for another time.) So if you think that MNCs should pay higher taxes, you really should be directing your criticism at the creators and administrators of tax regulations, not the taxpayers.

But why now?  And why does the attention seem to be falling not on those stereotypical sunny, shorts-wearing, palm tree-fringed, tropical island tax havens, but instead on respectable (if rather more gloomy, weather-wise) northern European nations like the Netherlands, Luxembourg, and Ireland?

I think a couple of factors are contributing to this.  First of all, I don’t think it’s a coincidence that the countries in question are EU members. In case you hadn’t noticed, the EU has been going through a bit of an economic rough patch over the past few years. The eurozone financial crisis that began in earnest in 2010 has highlighted and contributed to dramatic differences in economic performance and budget policy between EU member nations. Suspicion and resentment between European countries over economic and financial issues has probably never been greater since before the second world war.

But more specifically, I think that the troubled economic landscape in Europe over the past several years has brought to the forefront something that usually lies unseen in the background, but which transfer pricing practitioners are constantly reminded of: the world’s major countries are engaged in a constant, usually quiet battle with each other for tax revenue from MNCs.  It’s not quite true that MNC tax payments are a zero sum game, but as a first approximation that idea captures how tax administrations view the problem.  Each MNC has a pie of global tax payments. And each tax administration wants to capture as large a slice of that pie as they can.

So as many European countries feel the accumulated burden of years of economic and financial struggle, it’s not surprising that they have become more aggressive with each other in their battles over the share of the tax revenue they can claim from the world’s largest MNCs. I think this phenomenon will help keep the pressure on the participants in the OECD BEPS project to make sure that the new rules that come out of those negotiations are quite strict. And I’m sure we haven’t heard the last of how Europe’s low-tax jurisdictions help the world’s MNCs to reduce their overall tax bills.

One comment

  1. interesting reads & glad you’re laying out complex issues & their non-intuitive implications.

    -A

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